Raising Standards In UK Primary Schools

English: The Old Schools at Harrow School in H...

Photo credit: Wikipedia

A collection of moves to raise standards in primary schools were announced today.

From 2014, 65% of pupils will need to achieve the expected level (Level 4 in the ‘3Rs’) by the time they leave primary school, up from the current 60%. Primary schools which fall below this level (particularly those with a long history of under performance) face being taken over by an Academy sponsor. In 2012, 476 primary schools were below the standard – if the standard had been 65%, that figure would have been 866.

Additionally, a new indicator which will show how many 11-year-olds achieve a ‘good’ Level 4 will be published in performance tables this year. Gaining a ‘good’ level 4 at primary school has been demonstrated as an indicator of gaining A*-C grades at GCSE level.

Schools judged by Ofsted to be neither good nor outstanding, and who are not closing the gap between their disadvantaged pupils and other pupils, will be required to draw up an action plan of how they are spending their ‘pupil premium’ money. The pupil premium is additional funding provided to schools to support disadvantaged pupils and close the attainment gap between them and their peers. From April 2013 the pupil premium will be £900 per pupil (up from £623). This should help ensure that more children from disadvantaged backgrounds will leave primary school ‘secondary ready’.

This year’s £50m Summer School Programme has also been announced. This is aimed at helping pupils make a successful transition from primary to secondary school. Last year, 1,763 secondary schools ran a summer school.

“We must ensure that a far higher proportion of pupils are ‘secondary ready’ by the end of their primary school. This will allow them not simply to cope, but thrive, when presented with the challenges and opportunities of secondary school.”  [Schools Minister, David Laws]

You can read the full article at the Department Of Education website.

The Relocation Consultancy are experts in destination services and provide a range of options to support families moving to the UK. For a FREE consultation on the services that may be suitable for you, call +44 (0)118 947 0029 or email info@therelocationconsultancy.com. Alternately, you can find out more about our services at www.therelocationconsultancy.com

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Securing A Place In A UK Independent School

If you have children, it is important to begin addressing the issue of schooling prior to your departure, to ensure you and your family settle well at your destination.

Independent schools are fee paying schools. They can be single-sex or co-educational, start at any age between 4 and 18 years, can be day or boarding schools, large or small. They are independent in their finances and governance. They are funded by a combination of tuition charges, gifts and investments and are generally governed by a board of directors. All schools are registered and monitored by inspectorates approved by the Secretary of State and Ofsted.

For UK Independent Schooling, entrance is not restricted by where you live, unlike state schools.
Usually an interview is held, but if coming from abroad, this may not be necessary. There may be an academic assessment, particularly to those schools which perform particularly well at GCSE or A level. For entrance to senior schools there is usually an assessment, but this can simply be for ‘streaming’ purposes. Some schools look for high attainment in a particular area, such as sport, music, drama and/or art, while others simply want you to feel comfortable, and like the feel of the school.

Points to consider:

  • If there are places available and where you want to live.
  • Whether you can afford the fees. Costs vary dramatically from school to school and will increase as the child moves through the school. Boarding school fees can be considerably higher than the day fees (by more than 30%). School fees are typically lower in the North and for prep schools.
  • The environment you would like for your child(ren) e.g. single sex or co-educational,  religious affiliation, large or small school.
  • What the facilities are like for sports, music, drama, etc., and what the educational standard is.
  • What are the age ranges for the school? (i.e. a school that goes from 4-18 could be an excellent option to prevent having to move a child again during an assignment)
  • What is the family background / culture of pupils? (e.g. are there many expatriates / any children from the same country as you?)
  • What is the level of parental involvement? (e.g. is there a Parent/Teacher association to support the school)
  • What is your instinct about the school? How well did you get on with the staff?

Checklist for making an application:

  • Find out the specific admission procedure, as this can vary dramatically from school to school. Look at the websites and contact the school registrars directly by telephone – they are remarkable people who are always happy to give you an insight into the school.
  • A visit to the school is invaluable to make sure that it suits your child’s needs. They vary enormously and each has its own personality. A visit will give you (and your child) a proper feel for the school – how welcoming they are, what the facilities are like, what the teaching style is like and so on.
  • Meet all stated deadlines for submission of paperwork. Ensure the timeliness, completeness and accuracy of your admission document(s), or you may jeopardise your chance of securing a place.
  • Be prepared to compromise – the best private schools become very oversubscribed and can be difficult to get into. Independent schools offer a very good education, with the vast majority of pupils getting excellent examination results.

The Relocation Consultancy are experts in destination services and provide a range of options to support families needing school places for their children. For a FREE consultation on the services that may be suitable for you, call +44 (0)118 947 0029 or email info@therelocationconsultancy.com.

Securing A Place In A UK State School

If you have children, it is important to begin addressing the issue of schooling prior to your departure, to ensure you and your family settle well at your destination. The chosen house and neighbourhood will be most likely determined by the location of the school selected. Starting your planning early can help you to make well-informed choices and give you the best chance of securing a place at your selected school.

The UK is notoriously complex in its education, because of the variety of types of organisation that can be involved. Whilst the fee-paying sector is significant and may be perceived as providing a better education, this is not always necessarily the case.

With State Schools you will have to live within a ‘catchment zone’ before you can even apply to the school. Most good state schools are extremely oversubscribed, so you cannot always rely on a place being available, particularly if you are coming to the UK at short notice, or for a shorter assignment. Places are in the first instance offered based on who lives closest to the school.

Local authorities coordinate the admissions process for all children starting school at the beginning of a school year (in September). You can apply for a place at state schools online or by using the local authority’s common application form (you can find out your local authority here). The deadline for applications is normally October for entry in the following September, with places being allotted at the beginning of the following year. If you require your child to start at any other time in the year, you will more than likely be referred to the local authority.

Church schools have their own admittance criteria – i.e. ‘practicing a religion’ may be a requirement, or at least improve your chances of obtaining a place.

Checklist for deciding on a state school

  • Find out which schools in your area have places (a list can be obtained from your local authority).
  • Read relevant school prospectuses and/or websites.
  • Compare achievement and attainment data and the latest school reports from Ofsted.
  • Find out the catchment area for the school(s) you are interested – these are usually made up of a list of roads (this can usually be found on school websites).
  • Find out the specific admission procedure – this can vary from school to school.
  • Find out what extended services they offer outside of normal working hours (e.g. breakfast clubs, after school activities) and what they cost.
  • Visit the school to make sure that it really does suit your child’s needs (and take along a pen and paper to make notes). A school visit can be invaluable in giving you (and your child) a proper feel for the school – how welcoming they are, what the facilities are like, what the teaching style is like and so on. It is also an opportunity to find out detailed information on admissions, work out possible travel routes and find out about any parent associations you may like to get involved in.
  • Meet all stated deadlines for submission of paperwork, or you will have little (or no) chance of securing a place.

The Relocation Consultancy are experts in destination services and provide a range of options to support families needing school places for their children. For a FREE consultation on the services that may be suitable for you, call +44 (0)118 947 0029 or email info@therelocationconsultancy.com.